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Proliferation of Falcula hyalina and Cylindrotheca closterium (Bacillariophyceae) on copepods in Bahía de La Paz, Gulf of California, Mexico

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Occurrence of Panulirus inflatus (Decapoda: Palinuridae) pueruli in the southeastern Gulf of California, Mexico

Comparison of zooxanthellae densities from upside-down jellyfish, Cassiopea xamachana, across coastal habitats of The Bahamas

Authors

CORRESPONDING

Elizabeth W. Stoner

betsy.stoner18@gmail.com

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1

Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, 3000 N.E. 151st Street, North Miami, Florida 33181, United States of America

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2

Current Address: Loxahatchee River District, 2500 Jupiter Park Drive, Jupiter, FL 33458, USA

Serina S. Sebilian

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1

Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, 3000 N.E. 151st Street, North Miami, Florida 33181, United States of America

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3

Current Address: Presidio Trust, 1216 Ralston Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94129, USA

Craig A. Layman

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1

Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, 3000 N.E. 151st Street, North Miami, Florida 33181, United States of America

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Current Address: Department of Applied Ecology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA

Abstract

Anthropogenic disturbances may drive jellyfish blooms, and previous studies have suggested this is the case for upside-down jellyfish (Cassiopea xamachana). Cassiopea were found to have higher mean zooxanthellae densities in human-impacted areas on Abaco Island, The Bahamas, suggesting that nutrient loading in impacted sites may be one factor driving zooxanthellate jellyfish blooms. Gut contents from Cassiopea medusae were positively correlated to zooxanthellae densities, indicating that heterotrophically-derived nutrition may be an important factor in facilitating increased zooxanthellae population densities. Understanding the mechanisms driving jellyfish blooms is crucial for developing effective management strategies in impacted coastal ecosystems.

Key words

Benthic, facilitation, human impacts, heterotrophy, mutualism

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